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Trying out SonarQube

Keeping your code neat and tidy is a challenge. If you think that you can keep all the little things that make code readable in your head, well, kudos to you. I cannot. 

But with SonarQube it is quite a bit easier. I installed it to try it out on the Mojarra codebase and I have to say I am impressed. 

I would definitely recommend to give it a try. See http://www.sonarqube.org for more information.

And that is that.

Enjoy!

 

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It took a little while

When I first blogged that I had moved my blog I really should have said that I had started blogging at my new location. Now that the rest of the content has been "moved" over as well I can truly say "we have moved".

Why did I copy the content and not just leave it there? Well, I like to keep all my blogging in one place. So if I refer to something I blogged about before I can keep it on the same domain.

If you have suggestions on topics, comments or you just want to say hello, feel free to add comments to this blog entry.

And that is that.

Enjoy!

 

Time to recognize JCP heroes!

It is that time of year again, the time to recognize the JCP heroes, to vote please go to https://blogs.oracle.com/theaquarium/entry/help_recognize_java_community_process

And that is that.

Enjoy!

 

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JSF 2.3 @Inject Flash

Thanks to Arjan Tijms we can now inject the Flash

In code

  @Inject
  private Flash flash;

And that is that.

Enjoy!

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Mojarra GitHub read-only mirror

For folks that are looking for a GitHub mirror of the Mojarra sources please head on over to https://github.com/javaserverfaces/mojarra

And that is that.

Enjoy!

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Over 150 blog entries

I have written over 150 blog entries and if there is one thing I have learned about the experience is that writing is HARD. At times I thought I was crystal clear and then I found out that other people did not understand it. How to avoid that? I dare to say it is unavoidable ;)

Anyway, I hope I'll be able to blog some more. If you are interested in seeing particular topics do not hesitate to comment on this blog entry!

And that is that.

Enjoy!

 

Security Tip #2 - Generating your own intermediate CA certificate

In the previous blog entry we generated a root CA certificate. This blog entry will deal with creating an intermediate CA certificate signed by the root CA we created before.

The main reason why we do it this way is so we can keep the root CA keystore completely on offline storage. And use the intermediate CA certificate which we can revoke if necessary.

Lets generate your intermediate CA keystore

keytool -keystore my-intermediate-ca.jks -genkeypair 
-alias my-intermediate-ca -noprompt -dname "CN=My Intermediate CA"
-keyalg rsa -keysize 8192 -validity 365

 In order for us to be able to get the intermediate CA certificate signed by the root CA we need a CSR, so lets generate it

keytool -keystore my-intermediate-ca.jks 
-alias my-intermediate-ca -certreq -rfc
-file my-intermediate-ca.csr

Now we can use the root CA keystore to generate a signed certificate with the CSR we just generated. Lets do that now!

keytool -keystore my-ca.jks 
-alias my-ca -gencert -infile my-intermediate-ca.csr
-dname "CN=My Intermediate CA" -validity 365 -rfc
-outfile my-intermediate-ca.pem
-ext BasicConstraints:critical=ca:true
-ext KeyUsage:critical=keyCertSign,cRLSign

Now we will import both the root CA PEM file and the intermediate CA PEM file into the intermediate CA keystore. Note we need to import them both as the root CA certificate is needed to validate the signed intermediate certificate.

First we need to import the root CA certificate

keytool -keystore my-intermediate-ca.jks  -importcert 
-alias my-ca -file my-ca.pem

And then we need to import the intermediate CA certificate

keytool -keystore my-intermediate-ca.jks 
-alias my-intermediate-ca -importcert -file my-intermediate-ca.pem

And that is it.

Enjoy!

Security Tip #1 - Generating your own root CA certificate

If you are interested in creating your own root CA certificate then read on. 

The command line below will generate a root CA certificate (who by their nature are self-signed) with a keysize of 8192 and using the RSA key algorithm and a lifetime of 365 days from the time you issue the command.

Additional we say this certificate is a root CA certificate that will be used for certificate and revocation list signing.

keytool -keystore my-ca.jks -genkeypair 
-alias my-ca -dname "CN=My CA"  
-keyalg rsa -keysize 8192 -validity 365 -noprompt
-ext BasicConstraints:critical=CA:true
-ext KeyUsage:critical=keyCertSign,cRLSign

As we know that we will need to import the root CA certificate we will generate a PEM file for it.

keytool -exportcert -keystore my-ca.jks -rfc 
-alias my-ca > my-ca.pem

In the next blog entry we will create an intermediate CA so we can keep the root CA keystore safe.

And that is it.

Enjoy!

JSF Tip #65 - JSF 2.1 Facelet VDL documentation

If you are looking for the JSF 2.1 Facelet VDL documentation, see https://javaserverfaces.java.net/docs/2.1/vdldocs/facelets/

And that is that.

Enjoy!

JSF Tip #64 - JSF 2.2 Facelet VDL documentation

If you are looking for the JSF 2.2 Facelet VDL documentation, see https://javaserverfaces.java.net/nonav/docs/2.2/vdldocs/facelets/index.html

And that is that.

Enjoy!